Preservation of History

Fall 2017 – Producer ( Richard Zampella ) Announces Release of New Blu-Ray “Inside High Noon – Directors Cut” Narrated by Frank Langella.

“The newly edited documentary on the behind the scenes of the 1952 film HIGH NOON, will have new interview footage. The “INSIDE HIGH NOON- Directors Cut” documentary will be released Fall 2015 in Blu-Ray with numerous special features on the DVD” says producer Richard Zampella.

INSIDE HIGH NOON” is a documentary on the 1952 film HIGH NOON – Starring “Gary Cooper” & “Grace Kelly.” The behind the scenes documentary is Written/Directed by: “John Mulholland,” narrated by “Frank Langella,” produced by “Richard Zampella” & “Shannon Mulholland” with on camera interviews with “President Bill Clinton,” “Tim Zinneman” (son of director Fred Zinneman) “Jonathan Foreman” (son of screenwriter Carl Foreman) “Crown Prince Albert of Monaco” (Grace Kelly’s son) “Maria Cooper” (Gary Cooper’s daughter) “Brian Garfield,” “Lee Clark Mitchell,” “Stephen Prince,” and “Meir Ribalow.”

Richard Zampella

Richard Zampella announces Blu-Ray DVD of INSIDE HIGH NOON Documentary

www.insidehighnoon.com

Follow on Twitter: @insidehighnoon

Other Documentaries:

Cooper and Hemingway: The True Gen
http://www.cooperhemingway.com
Narrated by Sam Waterston
Written & Directed by John Mulholland
Produced by Richard Zampella & Shannon Mulholland

www.richardzampella.com
www.trans-multimedia.com

Sergeant York: Of God and Country
www.ofgodandcountry.com
Narrated by Liam Neeson
Written & Directed by John Mulholland
Produced by Richard Zampella & Shannon Mulholland

Richard Zampella Sergeant York Documentary

Sergeant York: Of God and Country
Narrated by Liam Neeson
Written/Directed by John Mulholland
Produced by Richard Zampella

Doc and Chou Chou Scantlin | Doc Scantlin & His Imperial Palms Orchestra | Richard Zampella

Richard Zampella was born and raised as the son of a physician that ran a medical facility located in Northwest, NJ. He first crossed paths with Doc and Chou Chou (pronounced Shoo Shoo) Scantlin in 1993 when they briefly met at Alexandra Millers’s 21st birthday party at the Rainbow Room in New York City. They would sporadically see one another around New York City including a chance meeting outside the service entrance of the Waldorf Astoria in 1999. That night, Doc and Chou Chou were performing at the Christopher Reeves Foundation Gala at the hotel. Brief pleasantries were exchanged that evening and ten years would pass before it would be reveal that they had something more in common.  In 2014, Zampella would read an article in the Huffington Post that included details about Chou Chou’s upbringing in Northwest, NJ – which also happened to mention that her mother worked as an administrator at the same medical facility in Northwest, NJ. The article went on to reveal that Zampella’s father was Chou Chou’s childhood pediatrician.  Zampella spoke with Chou Chou in the summer of 2013 and both were able to share common memories of both Dr. Arthur Zampella and Idylease located at 124 Union Valley Road in Newfoundland.

By Richard Zampella: The “21” Club – Alfred Hitchcock was a regular patron throughout his life here.

The “21” Club- Alfred Hitchcock was a regular patron throughout his life here.
By Richard Zampella

Richard Zampella

21 Club – New York City
By Richard Zampella

When one thinks of nightlife prior to World War II, images are conjured of late night haunts serving fare into the wee small hours of the morning and music playing till dawn. Nowhere epitomized being out and about on the town like New York City in the 1930’s and ‘40’s. It was a legendary moment in time.
After a period of four years probation was repealed, King Kong carried Faye Ray up the side of the Empire State Building, Duke Ellington was performing nightly at the Cotton Club on 125th Street in Harlem, and two resourceful cousins named Jack Kriendler and Charlie Berns legitimized a speakeasy at 21 West 52nd Street and christened it The “21” Club.
Although “21” had been raided more than once during prohibition, federal agents were never able to pin anything on Jack and Charlie. At the first sign of a raid, they would activate an ingenious system of pulleys and levers, which would sweep bottles from the bar shelves and hurl the smashed remains down a chute into the New York sewer system.
Throughout the ‘30’s, “21” was frequented by many literary figures of the time, among them: John Steinbeck, John O’Hara, Ernest Hemingway, Sinclair Lewis, H. G. Wells, and Robert Sherwood. In fact, every notable of the mid 20th Century found their way to “21” at one time or another. It rivaled the patronage of other legendary New York City haunts such as the Stork Club and El Morocco as one of Café Society’s most noted hangouts.
Richard Zampella

21 Club NYC
Article by Richard Zampella

In the 1940’s, Spellbound hit theatres starring Gregory Peck and is one of the earliest films to feature/mention the “21” Club. According to Jeff Kraft and Aaron Leventhal, co-authors of Footsteps in the Fog: Alfred Hitchcock’s San Francisco, Mr. Hitchcock had a long-standing connection to the “21” Club. Starting with his first trip to the United States from England in the late ‘30’s, he was a regular patron of the restaurant throughout his life. Humphrey Bogart frequented “21” as a struggling actor in his pre-Hollywood days. When he wasn’t carousing with friends, he was content to sit alone at the “21”, bent earnestly over a notebook, smoking a pipe and drinking scotch, fancying himself a budding playwright. His taste in booze careened wildly between scotch, Black Velvets (equal parts Guinness and champagne), bathtub gin martinis, beer, and Jack Rose cocktails.
Bogart would return to his old haunt in 1944 and propose to a youthful Lauren Bacall at Table 30. They first worked together in To Have and Have Not, based on the novel written by “21” regular, Ernest Hemingway (who was caught making love to gangster Legs Diamond’s girlfriend in the “21” kitchen in 1931). Hollywood came to “21” years later in the ‘50’s to shoot scenes for the classic films “All About Eve” starring Bette Davis and Anne Baxter and “The Sweet Smell of Success” with Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis.
The first of the 33 replicas of jockeys standing watch outside the front doors of “21” was donated by patron Jay Van Urk in the early ‘30’s. In 1992, a jockey was stolen from the restaurant and that news was reported on page 2 of the New York Post. The next day, a “21” regular was glancing outside his office window overlooking Washington Square Park and spotted the jockey in a shopping cart and phoned police. In 2004, there was a collection of 33 jockeys, the most recent from Saratoga Stables representing the great New York horse, Sunny Cide, winner of 2003’s Kentucky Derby and Preakness races.
In the past few years, “21” has seen its share of renovations and remains one of the few classic restaurants still existing from the golden age of New York City nightlife. It remains a refreshing throwback to the grand dining of a bygone era. The classic American fare is still deftly executed and the menu, with or without a great bottle of wine, remains an enjoyable experience for New Yorkers and visitors alike. It will no doubt provide memories for generations to come.
New York Historic Restaurants
Richard Zampella
“Richard Zampella”
@transmultimedia

Richard Zampella – Remembering my father A.D. Zampella, MD

Dr. Arthur Zampella
May 15, 1917 – January 9, 1992
http://www.arthurzampella.com

“Richard Zampella” – January 9, 2014 Dr Arthur Zampella: 22nd Anniversary of his Death

North Jersey.com January 9, 2014 West Milford had a great loss on this date in 1992

 

“Richard Zampella”

Sergeant York: Of God and Country- Review: Remarkable Sgt. York Documentary

Sergeant York: Of God and Country
www.ofgodandcountry.com
A documentary
Narrated by: Liam Neeson
Written & Directed by: John Mulholland
On Camera Participants: Maria Cooper, Joan Leslie, June Lockhart, Michael Birdwell, M.Z. Ribalow, and Film Historian Robert Osborne.
Produced by: Richard Zampella & Shannon Mulholland

Review: Remarkable Sgt. York Documentary
Author: chrish1967 from United States

I am used to just fast-forwarding through extras on DVD double-discs, so “Sergeant York: Of God And Country” caught me totally unawares. Instead of the usual focus on silly anecdotes about the daily production, this is something else entirely.

Richard-Zampella+Shannon-Mulholland-Sergeant-York

“Sergeant York: Of God and Country” Narrated by Liam Neeson
Written and Directed by John Mulholland
Produced by Richard Zampella and Shannon Mulholland

It is that rare documentary about a movie which gives you far more than info on the movie, though it certainly does give you all you need and want to know about the history of the film and its production. However, it also gives you a fascinating history of the era in which it was made, everything from anti-Semitism and isolationism to rural America and WW II.

Richard-Zampella+Shannon-Mulholland-Gary-Cooper-York

Gary Cooper as Sergeant York

 

I can’t recommend this highly enough. My only complaint would be that it is too short. It moves along so smoothly, the story-telling — for that’s what it is, the history lesson is nothing less than beautifully crafted story-telling — is so effortless. that it’s over before you know it.

This is how these “making of” docs should be done! Could use this in both film class and history class.
More on IMDB

Shannon-Mulholland-Sergeant-York-Film

Sergeant York documentary – “Sergeant York: Of God and Country” Directed by John Mulholland Produced by Richard Zampella and Shannon Mulholland

Richard Zampella – Tribute to John D MacDonald – lifetime of dedication & preservation to the community

The Long Beach Herald

John MacDonald Honored
Point Lookout Chamber of Commerce Honors John D. MacDonald
By RICHARD ZAMPELLA

I had the opportunity to speak with our honoree, John MacDonald Sr., on Saturday, April 20, for about two hours. It was not long before it became obvious to me that he has a deep-rooted love and affection for this community. His service and dedication to our business community for the last eight decades is unmatched. He will say the there is no other community like Point Lookout, N.Y He will say it is a rare and unique jewel remaining virtually untouched by the outside world.

We honored MacDonald Sr., who celebrated his 91st birthday in January, with the chamber’s Lifelong Achievement Award on April 24. If you have ever wondered how it is that our “little community by the sea” has maintained its charm and remains free of the urban sprawl of surrounding areas, you would need to thank our honoree. His selfless efforts and quiet service to this community has resulted in an improved quality life for all in Point Lookout.

MacDonald came here with his family in 1929, from Oceanside; via Salem, Massachusetts, at the tender age of 9. At that time, there were approximately 43 families that lived in town year round. It was the height of the Depression, and he will tell you emphatically, “times were tough.”

He will tell you that the family business had its humble beginning with a building boom that occurred on Inwood Avenue around 1935, which was only intended to be a temporary street at one time. The land beyond it was a series of dunes that ebbed and flowed with the tides.

Our honoree recalled how he cut the rumble seat of the back of the chassis of his Model A Ford and retrofitted it as an improvised pickup truck. He will also recall how he used to take that Model A out on the ice of Reynolds Channel when it froze over in the winter.

In addition to being a successful entrepreneur and businessmen, MacDonald has been a quiet servant of this community for many years. He is a two-time chief of the Point Lookout Volunteer Fire Company Inc., and he will politely remind you not to confuse it with the current day Pt. Lookout Fire Department.

It’s first chief was Joe Scully and the 15 members moved the original engine room with Old Sam’s Horses on block and tackle to it’s current location that we know as Ye Ole Firehouse.

The community banded together and raised funds themselves by selling bonds and volunteering their work to build the all purpose hall and the east wing on the firehouse. The family business put in the plumbing. This early group of local leaders and businessmen were never intimidated by the daunting initiatives that they tackled. They were motivated with a can-do spirit. This group of merchants did not need to rely on local government for support. If they saw a need, they did it.

Together they built a community center that saw grand evenings, theater productions, dinner dances, weddings and it was the meeting spot for both Churches before they had their own buildings. It was the heartbeat of the community and.a monument to civic cooperation.

MacDonald erected the first public Christmas tree in town on Lido Boulevard. He will probably not tell you how much trouble he got into when he shorted out the family fuse box as a result. He would go on to organize the decoration of holiday lights on Lido Boulevard each year with the local electrician.

MacDonald also helped form the first Boy Scout troop in Point Lookout, along with Ludwig Meier. At the time Point Lookout was all sand and no trees. Troop 525 planted the trees that adorn town so they could all attend the international Boy Scout jamboree that was held in Switzerland that year. If you appreciate the shade during the summer around town, you may want to thank MacDonald.

For 17 years, MacDonald served as the chairman of the zoning committee of the civic association, and served for 20 years on its board of directors. His tenure saw the elimination of two-family housing, which has maintained the character of the community to this day. He hung the first halyard on the top of the Coast Guard Station Flag Pole. He erected Point Lookout’s first ice skating rink.

In the 1950’s his father saw to it that the special parks district and beaches were protected for generations to come and in 1954 the-beach and the parks were protected.

In the 1960s, he served as a Republican committeeman responsible for numerous legislative changes to protect the community including spearheading the purchase of the Vest Park Property that is adjacent to Merola’s.

In the ’70s, he once again came to the assistance of his firehouse. When the Board of Fire Commissioners threatened demolition, he made sure violations in the building were corrected in order to ensure its survival. He will ask you to reflect that no other community in Nassau County really has anything like it and even today it’s very existence continues to be threatened by the Board of Fire Commissioners.

Today he continues to play an active role with local legislators: It is not unusual to see him leading an entourage of dignitaries through town with suggestions for community improvements.

It is with great pride that the Point Lookout Chamber of Commerce, his friends and professional associates salute and celebrate master plumber McDonald Sr., with a lifelong achievement award for his outstanding service and dedication to our business community and civic contributions to his beloved town of Point Lookout.

Richard Zampella is the president of the Point Lookout Chamber of Commerce.

May 29, 2013 – Point Lookout Historical Society – Pt. Lookout Chamber Honors MacDonald
May 29, 2013 – Point Lookout Chamber of Commerce – Long Beach Herald Runs John D MacDonald Tribute

A study of these two men is a study of the 20th century. Gary Cooper & Ernest Hemingway

Cooper and Hemingway: The True Gen
A New York Times Critic’s Pick
A feature documentary on the 20 year friendship of Gary Cooper and Ernest Hemingway
Narrated by Sam Waterston
Voice of Ernest Hemingway by Len Cariou
Directed by John Mulholland
Produced by Richard Zampella & Shannon Mulholland

“If there’d been no Coop, Hemingway would’ve had to invent him”  – Alistair Cooke

Ernest Hemingway: “Coop is a fine man; as honest and straight and friendly and unspoiled as he looks. If you made up a character like Coop, nobody’d believe it.” 

And if you made up a character like Ernest Hemingway, how many would believe it? The mercurial Hemingway left people enchanted, hostile, confused, charmed, bruised, bitter.

Shannon-Mulholland-Cooper-and-Hemingway.jpg

Cooper and Hemingway: The True Gen
Written & Directed by John Mulholland
Narrated by Sam Waterston
Produced by Richard Zampella + Shannon Mulholland

 

Utter opposites … nothing in common. The cowboy and the suburbanite. The conservative and the liberal. And yet these two artists (a word both men scoffed at) were the best of friends, right up to their deaths a mere seven weeks apart in 1961.  But is the friendship of these two men really so surprising?

Consider this Cooper obituary: “Perhaps with Gary Cooper there is ended a certain America. That of the frontier and of innocence, which had or was believed to have an exact sense of the dividing line between good and evil.” Corriere Della Sera, Rome.

Substitute the name of Hemingway’s Robert Jordan and the sentiment is just as apt and poignant.

A study of these two men is a study of the 20th century. Their internationally renowned careers (Cooper, two Best Actor Academy Awards; Hemingway, Nobel and Pulitzer Prizes) were played out over the same turbulent decades: the hedonistic 20s, the grim Depression 30s, the war-ravaged 40s, and the deceptively slumbering 50s.

It is no small irony that the lives of these two men should suffer untimely ends at the dawn of the erupting sixties. Their final, poignant chapter closed at the beginning of a decade which would challenge many of the very ideals and precepts which both men so prominently represented.

Richard-Zampella-Shannon-Mulholland-Cooper-and-Hemingway

Cooper – Hemingway Telegram
“Cooper and Hemingway: The True Gen”

 

And yet, decades later, we have Liam Neeson reflecting:  “…the character of Bryan Mills (Taken) fits into a cinematic iconic figure that we all recognize from way back … I’m thinking of Gary Cooper in High Noon, who is kind of a Bryan Mills. That kind of iconic figure that audiences seem to be attracted to.

Or Katniss Everdeen, the hero from The Hunger Games. For all the modern trappings, the extraordinarily courageous and selfless Katniss is really just a female updating of the Hemingway/Cooper hero. She’s Robert Jordan. She’s Will Kane. To understand Ernest Hemingway and Gary Cooper is to understand both the genesis of Katniss Everdeen and why she and other contemporary characters represent what they do to audiences today.

Perhaps Cooper and Hemingway didn’t really pass the torch, perhaps they merely leant it.

-John Mulholland

www.cooperhemingway.com
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