Month: January 2014

By Richard Zampella: The “21” Club – Alfred Hitchcock was a regular patron throughout his life here.

The “21” Club- Alfred Hitchcock was a regular patron throughout his life here.
By Richard Zampella

Richard Zampella

21 Club – New York City
By Richard Zampella

When one thinks of nightlife prior to World War II, images are conjured of late night haunts serving fare into the wee small hours of the morning and music playing till dawn. Nowhere epitomized being out and about on the town like New York City in the 1930’s and ‘40’s. It was a legendary moment in time.
After a period of four years probation was repealed, King Kong carried Faye Ray up the side of the Empire State Building, Duke Ellington was performing nightly at the Cotton Club on 125th Street in Harlem, and two resourceful cousins named Jack Kriendler and Charlie Berns legitimized a speakeasy at 21 West 52nd Street and christened it The “21” Club.
Although “21” had been raided more than once during prohibition, federal agents were never able to pin anything on Jack and Charlie. At the first sign of a raid, they would activate an ingenious system of pulleys and levers, which would sweep bottles from the bar shelves and hurl the smashed remains down a chute into the New York sewer system.
Throughout the ‘30’s, “21” was frequented by many literary figures of the time, among them: John Steinbeck, John O’Hara, Ernest Hemingway, Sinclair Lewis, H. G. Wells, and Robert Sherwood. In fact, every notable of the mid 20th Century found their way to “21” at one time or another. It rivaled the patronage of other legendary New York City haunts such as the Stork Club and El Morocco as one of Café Society’s most noted hangouts.
Richard Zampella

21 Club NYC
Article by Richard Zampella

In the 1940’s, Spellbound hit theatres starring Gregory Peck and is one of the earliest films to feature/mention the “21” Club. According to Jeff Kraft and Aaron Leventhal, co-authors of Footsteps in the Fog: Alfred Hitchcock’s San Francisco, Mr. Hitchcock had a long-standing connection to the “21” Club. Starting with his first trip to the United States from England in the late ‘30’s, he was a regular patron of the restaurant throughout his life. Humphrey Bogart frequented “21” as a struggling actor in his pre-Hollywood days. When he wasn’t carousing with friends, he was content to sit alone at the “21”, bent earnestly over a notebook, smoking a pipe and drinking scotch, fancying himself a budding playwright. His taste in booze careened wildly between scotch, Black Velvets (equal parts Guinness and champagne), bathtub gin martinis, beer, and Jack Rose cocktails.
Bogart would return to his old haunt in 1944 and propose to a youthful Lauren Bacall at Table 30. They first worked together in To Have and Have Not, based on the novel written by “21” regular, Ernest Hemingway (who was caught making love to gangster Legs Diamond’s girlfriend in the “21” kitchen in 1931). Hollywood came to “21” years later in the ‘50’s to shoot scenes for the classic films “All About Eve” starring Bette Davis and Anne Baxter and “The Sweet Smell of Success” with Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis.
The first of the 33 replicas of jockeys standing watch outside the front doors of “21” was donated by patron Jay Van Urk in the early ‘30’s. In 1992, a jockey was stolen from the restaurant and that news was reported on page 2 of the New York Post. The next day, a “21” regular was glancing outside his office window overlooking Washington Square Park and spotted the jockey in a shopping cart and phoned police. In 2004, there was a collection of 33 jockeys, the most recent from Saratoga Stables representing the great New York horse, Sunny Cide, winner of 2003’s Kentucky Derby and Preakness races.
In the past few years, “21” has seen its share of renovations and remains one of the few classic restaurants still existing from the golden age of New York City nightlife. It remains a refreshing throwback to the grand dining of a bygone era. The classic American fare is still deftly executed and the menu, with or without a great bottle of wine, remains an enjoyable experience for New Yorkers and visitors alike. It will no doubt provide memories for generations to come.
New York Historic Restaurants
Richard Zampella
“Richard Zampella”
@transmultimedia

A New Year’s Eve celebration at the Rainbow Room in 1935 | Richard Zampella

The Rainbow Room Richard Zampella

The Rainbow Room 1935

The Iconic Rainbow Room – A magical place to me. – Richard Zampella

Board Considering Landmark Status for Rainbow Room Said ‘No’ Once Before
-New York Times

“Richard Zampella”

Richard Zampella – Remastering Standard Def Library to HD-Blue Ray

Preserving a library of over 1000 hours of interviews on Classic Hollywood, Authors, Directors, Actors, Producers among others.
Remastering the library from standard Def to HD-BlueRay. Preserving for the future.
– Richard Zampella

TransMultimedia to Remaster SD Library of 1000+ Hours of Archival Interviews to HD/Blu Ray

TransMultimedia Entertainment (www.trans-multimedia.com) has announced that it is remastering its standard definition library which includes over a 1000 hours of never seen before interview footage.

TransMultimedia will bring over 1000 hours of archival interviews featuring subjects of Classic Hollywood actors, directors, fashion designers, producers, authors and more into HD format for Blu-ray or new media exploitation in the years to come. A full list of subject matter will be released in the coming weeks.

“Richard Zampella” – Managing Partner of TransMultimedia, commented: “Our decision to remaster these incredible interviews not only allows existing fans to experience these historical stories of the golden age of Hollywood in high definition, but also encourages a new global audience to discover and see some of these interviews for the first time.

“We have an exciting and busy year ahead but are confident that our Blu-ray plans for these treasures will ensure that these informative and educational archival interviews will live on for generations to come.”

TransMultimedia is a New York based media company that produces content in all media throughout the world. Learn more on various preservation projects by Managing Partner of TransMultimedia, “Richard Zampella” at his Historic Continuance blog.

TransMultimedia produced the NY Times Critic’s Pick feature documentary in HD/Blu-Ray “Cooper and Hemingway: The True Gen” (cooperhemingway.com) released in theaters in 2013 as well as numerous multimedia projects.

TransMultimedia to Remaster SD Library of 1000+ Hours of Archival Interviews to HD/Blu Ray
http://press.jamestimothywhite.com/transmultimedia-to-remaster-sd-library-of-1000-hours-of-archival-interviews-to-hdblu-ray/
News at Silobreaker
TransMultimedia to Remaster SD Library of 1000+ Hours of Archival Interviews to HD/Blu Ray

-Richard Zampella
http://www.richardzampella.com
http://www.trans-multimedia.com

“Richard Zampella”

Richard Zampella – Remembering my father A.D. Zampella, MD

Dr. Arthur Zampella
May 15, 1917 – January 9, 1992
http://www.arthurzampella.com

“Richard Zampella” – January 9, 2014 Dr Arthur Zampella: 22nd Anniversary of his Death

North Jersey.com January 9, 2014 West Milford had a great loss on this date in 1992

 

“Richard Zampella”

Sergeant York: Of God and Country- Review: Remarkable Sgt. York Documentary

Sergeant York: Of God and Country
www.ofgodandcountry.com
A documentary
Narrated by: Liam Neeson
Written & Directed by: John Mulholland
On Camera Participants: Maria Cooper, Joan Leslie, June Lockhart, Michael Birdwell, M.Z. Ribalow, and Film Historian Robert Osborne.
Produced by: Richard Zampella & Shannon Mulholland

Review: Remarkable Sgt. York Documentary
Author: chrish1967 from United States

I am used to just fast-forwarding through extras on DVD double-discs, so “Sergeant York: Of God And Country” caught me totally unawares. Instead of the usual focus on silly anecdotes about the daily production, this is something else entirely.

Richard-Zampella+Shannon-Mulholland-Sergeant-York

“Sergeant York: Of God and Country” Narrated by Liam Neeson
Written and Directed by John Mulholland
Produced by Richard Zampella and Shannon Mulholland

It is that rare documentary about a movie which gives you far more than info on the movie, though it certainly does give you all you need and want to know about the history of the film and its production. However, it also gives you a fascinating history of the era in which it was made, everything from anti-Semitism and isolationism to rural America and WW II.

Richard-Zampella+Shannon-Mulholland-Gary-Cooper-York

Gary Cooper as Sergeant York

 

I can’t recommend this highly enough. My only complaint would be that it is too short. It moves along so smoothly, the story-telling — for that’s what it is, the history lesson is nothing less than beautifully crafted story-telling — is so effortless. that it’s over before you know it.

This is how these “making of” docs should be done! Could use this in both film class and history class.
More on IMDB

Shannon-Mulholland-Sergeant-York-Film

Sergeant York documentary – “Sergeant York: Of God and Country” Directed by John Mulholland Produced by Richard Zampella and Shannon Mulholland

Richard Zampella – Classic Films – Study the Past if you wish to Define the Future

Richard Zampella: Why study and focus on Classic Hollywood?
“Study the Past if you wish to Define the Future”

Discussions with John Mulholland

Having a singular vision and unique passion: To bring back into the mainstream the legendary entertainment names of yesteryear – actors, directors, writers, producers defining for contemporary audiences both why and how these remarkable legends are still relevant in our fractious, highly charged and diverse world.
Classic Hollywood matters.

Yes, it’s been covered, exhaustively so; seven ways from Sunday, as they say.

And, certainly, it is well known indeed to its ‘ limited (read: aging) audience. Those fabled stars, those legendary directors, producers, writers, editors, cinematographers, what possibly can they have to do with today? With CGI, hyper-editing, Imax, sex, violence, slasher, computer animation, the net, hell, the sheer global breadth of pop culture, what matters classic Hollywood?!?

Well, how about, say, without John Garfield, there’d be no DeNiro?

Watch Meg Ryan, Anne Heche or Reese Witherspoon, then watch Jean Arthur, Carole Lombard or Irene Dunne.
Want to understand whence came Pacino? Watch Cagney.

Meryl Streep? Bette Davis.

Without Gary Cooper, would there be Clint Eastwood (Who once asked his friend and biographer, Richard Schickel: “Think I’m Coop?”)?

And while we’re on Eastwood, check out his stately pacing as director, then watch the works of Fred Zinnemann, William Wyler and George Stevens.

Today’s feisty independent women – Angelina Jolie, Catherine Zeta Jones and Renee Zellwigger – are direct descendants of Barbara Stanwyck, Joan Crawford and Myrna Loy.

And speaking of Stanwyck, what are femme fatales Kathleen Turner (Body Heat) and Linda Fiorentino (The Last Seduction) but mirrors of Stanwyck’s double-dealing femme fatale in Double Indemnity?

Check out 1957’s Zero Hour, and then watch Airplane.

Notting Hill = Roman Holiday.

Watch Gene Hackman, watch Spencer Tracy.

Gangsters: Before The Godfather I and II, there were Public Enemy, Roaring Twenties and White Heat.
Musical bios: Yankee Doodle Dandy and Walk The Line, while cultivating the same territory, both reflect the times they were made.

Before the remarkable Hugh Jackman, there was the remarkable Gene Kelly.

Without cinematographers Floyd Crosby and Ted McCord, would Jack Green and Janusz Kaminski be the artists they are?
Conjure up a John Williams score and then listen to the works of Dimitri Tiomkin, Victor Young and Miklos Rozsa.
Trend setters in fashion? Familiar with Katherine Hepburn, circa 1934?

Do films reflect their times? Watch 1940’s Pride And Prejudice and 2005’s Pride And Prejudice. Or, measure War Of The Worlds 1953 against War Of The Worlds 2005. To understand the existential urban loner of 2007, just watch Bogart from the 1940s. Want to define courage and masculinity in the face of impossible odds, 1952’s High Noon nails it like nothing else. How do we feel about war – Sands Of Iwo Jima (1949) vs. Flags Of Our Fathers/Letters From Iwo Jima (2007). To understand where the U. S. was in the late 30s, early 40s, with isolationists battling interventionists, study the making of 1941’s Sergeant York. Both versions of The Manchurian Candidate (1962, 2004) contain the same basic plot, yet both are crystal-clear reflections of the times they were made.

What do Scarface (32) and Scarface (83) say about who we are, where we are, what kind of world we live in?
Is Johnny Depp’s effete pirate a total original? Or the inevitable next step after Errol Flynn’s dashing Captain Blood in the 30s and Burt Lancaster’s openly comic Crimson Pirate in the 50s?

If today’s stars think they’re the first to be hammered by the tabloid press, perhaps a look at Errol Flynn’s career might enlighten them.

Classic Hollywood matters. Very much.

Producing documentaries on classic films explore why – seven ways from Sunday. For in exploring that so-called Golden Era from a refreshingly original prism of vision, through various comparisons and idea also offer a fresh POV on today’s complex global era.

Richard Zampella, Preserving history
Film Documentaries:
Sergeant York: Of God and Country Narrated by Liam Neeson
Inside High Noon Narrated by Frank Langella

Delmonico’s Restaurant – first luxury restaurant in New York City

Founded by Swiss immigrants in 1824, Delmonico’s Restaurant was the first luxury restaurant in New York, and for almost 100 years defined “haute cuisine” in America.

Delmonico's 44th Street, 1903

Delmonico’s 44th Street, 1903

Read More: Delmonico’s Restaurant

-Richard Zampella